VIRTUAL REALITY MUSEUM

TOUR OUR TIME CAPSULE ONLINE

 

A rural electricity generating building in Sussex, England encapsulates time

AFFORDABILITY | COUNCILS | HOMES | INDEX | VILLAGES

  

 

2017 -  Time is captured in the preservation of the electricity generating complex at Herstmonceux in Sussex, information that would not normally be available to anyone living outside the village of Herstmonceux, but with the advent of the digital revolution this may change if we can  secure the funding needed to develop the concept of the virtual museum.

 

This unique reminder of our past could have been open to the public, but for the onerous conditions that the local authority would seek to apply if the Trust were to allow site visits. Insurance too might then become an issue as would the cost of staff. The spanner thrown into the works by Wealden officials may work to our advantage if the site can be experienced as a cultural and learning experience by millions of people online. In our conservation works we receive no financial help from Historic England, the Heritage Lottery Fund, or Wealden District Council. Copyright © photograph 30 June 2017.

 

 

In the digital age, where the financial burden of works to be able to allow visitors to the site are beyond the capacity of the Trust and Wealden District Council have shown that they would be unwilling to allow repairs to the original specification, the cost of the additional works to meet current building regulations would not only tend to undermine the originality of the structure that has stood the test of time, but also cause long term loss - and so detract from the conservation efforts of the Trust - a virtual tour is planned to replace any opening to the public of the complex.

 

In terms of climate change, a virtual tour uses considerably less energy to educate the public, hence may be described as a low carbon economy project.

 

THE CHALLENGE

 

In furtherance of the Virtual Reality Museum of the future (the project) we are inviting help from video producers and IT specialists in the hope that we can make the experience something special and develop the technology for other museums around the world - again in the spirit of reducing carbon miles traveling to educational establishments - where a tour may be digital and equally informative.

 

If you have any ideas or proposals for such a project please contact Lime Park Heritage Trust. We understand that in some cases that grants may be available for innovative social and cultural projects as mentioned in some of the extracts of the support websites below.

 

 

 

 

EUROPEAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUND

 

The ERDF aims to strengthen economic and social cohesion in the European Union by correcting imbalances between its regions.

The ERDF focuses its investments on several key priority areas. This is known as 'thematic concentration':

* Innovation and research;
* The digital agenda;
* Support for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs);
* The low-carbon economy.

The ERDF resources allocated to these priorities will depend on the category of region.

In more developed regions, at least 80 % of funds must focus on at least two of the above priorities. In transition regions, this focus is for 60 % of the funds and in developed regions the fund is 50%.

 

Some ERDF resources must be channeled specifically towards low-carbon economy projects:

* More developed regions: 20%;
* Transition regions: 15%; and
* Less developed regions: 12%.

 

 

NESTA digital R&D fund for arts and culture

 

NESTA - DIGITAL R&D FUND FOR THE ARTS

 

The Digital R&D Fund for the Arts supported ideas that use digital technology to build new business models and enhance audience reach for organisations with arts projects.

 

Why did they do this?

 

The fund, a partnership between Nesta, the Arts Council England and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), encouraged collaboration between the arts, digital technology providers and the research community in order to undertake experiments from which the wider arts sector could learn.

 

What did they do?

 

£7million was made available for projects over the period 2012-2015 for projects up to a value of £125,000. Two new strands within the fund were introduced in 2013 to encourage applications around big data and research with funding up to £300,000.

 

The fund itself is now closed but you can access the free resources created as part of the programme of work from the timeline below, which includes a digital toolkit for the arts, research papers and a portal for exploring the results of the Digital Culture survey. The National Archives has also published an archive version of the website

 

The background

 

The Digital R&D Fund for the Arts in England followed a pilot exercise (The Digital Research & Development Fund for Arts and Culture) during 2011/12 between the Arts Council England, Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC) and Nesta to support arts and cultural organisations across England who wanted to work with digital technologies to:

 

* expand their audience reach and engagement and/or

* explore new business models

 

Each of the pilot projects was selected because they would produce research and data that other arts and cultural organisations would value highly and, possibly, develop new products/services that could be used by other organisations. A key element of the fund is the partnerships between arts and cultural organisations, technology providers and researchers.

 

We invited Dr Paul Gerhardt, of Archives for Creativity, to work with the pilot projects to compile brief case studies of each project, and to capture the main learning points. You can read a summary of his findings here, and the more detailed case studies via the links below.

 

Scratchr

CulturApp: Dickens London Trails 

Social Interpretation

Pulse

Culture Cloud

Punchdrunk: Sleep No More

Dero

Happenstance

 

 

 

THE ARTS COUNCIL

 

In partnership with Nesta and AHRC, the Artc Council funded 52 arts and culture organisations to collaborate with tech companies and researchers to explore new ways to reach audiences or generate income.

 

This is the fourth year of research tracking the changing uses and impact of technology among arts and cultural organisations.

The survey, delivered by MTM London, received responses from over 1,400 arts and cultural organisations on how they use digital technology to support their work, what impact it brings, and the barriers to and conditions necessary to achieve their digital aims.

 

You can also look at a Data Portal which has been specially designed to help you explore the results from Digital Culture survey in more depth.

This portal displays responses from 2017, along with data from the 2013, 2014 and 2015 studies. You can use the portal to focus on parts of the survey that interest you. For instance, you can find out how many galleries in London have used crowdfunding to raise funds for new projects.

 

 

FACTSHEETS - A number of fact sheets are available, analyzing the data by ACE art form and the National Portfolio Organisation cohort.

 

Combined Arts
Dance
Literature
Museums
Music
Theatre
Visual Arts
National Portfolio Organisations

 

 

 

EUROPEAN SOCIAL FUND

 

For the 2014-2020 period, the ESF will focus on four of the cohesion policy's thematic objectives:

> promoting employment and supporting labour mobility
> promoting social inclusion and combating poverty
> investing in education, skills and lifelong learning
> enhancing institutional capacity and an efficient public administration

In addition, 20 % of ESF investments will be committed to activities improving social inclusion and combating poverty. This is known as thematic concentration.

To find out more: see the European Social Fund rules and the ESF website

 

Organisations receiving (ESF) or match funds must comply with the information and publicity regulatory requirements of the European Union (EU) and the England ESF programme.

Your publicity must include the activities explained in this section:

* use the ESF logo
* display project plaques
* inform participants about ESF and EU support
* spread the word – publicise project activity
* promote the national message
* meet your contractual requirements


The ESF investments cover all EU regions. More than € 80 billion is earmarked for human capital investment in Member States between 2014 and 2020, with an extra of at least € 3.2 billion allocated to the Youth Employment Initiative.

 

 

 

THE ESF IN THE UNITED KINGDOM

The United Kingdom is using ESF funding to reduce inactivity among young people and the long-term unemployed and to improve training and skills. It is also investing in education and lifelong learning, and is promoting social inclusion by fighting poverty and discrimination.

Across Europe and in the UK the ESF is supporting jobs, helping people get better jobs and ensuring fairer living standards and job opportunities for all EU citizens. It is doing this by investing in Europe’s human capital – its workers, its young people, disadvantaged groups and all those seeking a job. Tens of thousands of ESF projects are active in Europe’s cities, towns, rural communities and neighbourhoods. They are opening doors to skills, to work, to qualifications and to a more inclusive society for all Europeans.

During 2014-2020, the ESF and European Regional Development Fund are investing around €11.8 billion across the UK. The ESF share of €4.9 billion is funding six operational programmes in Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland, England and Gibraltar, and includes €206 million for the Youth Employment Initiative (YEI).
Bridging the job gap

The ESF is funding projects to increase employment levels, in particular among young people and those facing obstacles to getting a job. Initiatives addressing the long-term unemployed, the economically inactive and those at risk of poverty and social exclusion include tackling barriers to entering and staying in work by providing skills training. Actions to get women into work include reskilling, retraining and initiatives to reduce the gender employment gap.
Working on inclusion

In line with the UK’s commitment to tackling poverty and welfare dependency through work, the ESF is focusing on disadvantaged groups, including disabled people, ethnic minorities, ex-offenders and women needing childcare provision. Projects are providing pre-employment training and help for disadvantaged groups, which is tailored to local needs. Skills training and support in the transition from unemployment into work are also benefitting those at risk of social exclusion. For example, in London’s Brixton Prison, the ESF-funded Bad Boys’ Bakery project is training inmates to become bakers and to find work when they are released.
Keeping up with change

To boost productivity, increase competitiveness and meet labour market needs, the ESF is promoting upskilling and reskilling to help those already in work. Young people, in particular, are gaining the intermediate and higher-level skills, qualifications, training and career advice they need to enter and stay in the labour market. Priorities also include training for the unemployed and disadvantaged groups, improving links between education and work, more support for apprenticeships and traineeships, and equipping students, graduates and young people with the skills to start and grow a business.

 

 

NETWORK FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

 

The Network for Social Change is a group of individuals providing funding for progressive social change, particularly in the areas of justice, peace and the environment. Together we give well over £1 million a year to a variety of projects and organisations. About 90% of this is through our charity Network for Social Change Charitable Trust, with the rest through our non-charity, Funding for Social Change Limited.

Network For Social Change
BM 2063
London
WC1N 3XX

 

 

Herstmonceux Science Museum in East Sussex, Observatory, Lime Park

 

MONUMENT AT RISK - The main generating buildings when in need a new roof and other repairs. The felt roof was a temporary measure to prevent water ingress where privately owned historic buildings are not considered to be important enough to warrant help from the Heritage Lottery Fund or Historic England.

 

 

   

 

LINKS & REFERENCE

 

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/creative-media/digital-rd-fund-arts-2012-15

http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/

http://www.nesta.org.uk/project/digital-rd-fund-arts

http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/en/funding/erdf/

https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/categories/local-community

https://www.leetchi.com/en/fundraising

http://www.sussexmuseums.co.uk/
http://www.museumsassociation.org/

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/

http://www.wealden.gov.uk/

http://www.thekeep.info/

 

 

 

Herstmonceux Science Museum  -  http://www.electricity-guide.org.uk/providers/seeboard-energy.html

 

ANTIQUE DOCUMENT - This is an amazingly rare find, a document dated from February of 1911. These are one of a series of instructions to the engineers who were operating the generating machinery in Lime Park. You may notice that in addition to generating electricity for the village that plant was in situ for making ice. Luxury indeed in 1911.

 

 

HERITAGE INDEX A - Z

 

BARON CARL VON ROEMER

JOHN HOPKINSON

CAMPBELL HALL - BLUEBIRD ELECTRIC CARS - BE1 - BE2 - BE3 - BE4

GAS ENGINES - COAL CONVERSION, INTERNAL COMBUSTION

HX FIRE STATION

HX MUSEUM - LTD

HX SCIENCE EXHIBITS

OBSERVATORY - HERSTMONCEUX CASTLE

SX MUSEUMS

PLANNING APP JAN 2015

RAF BEACHY HEAD

RAF HERSTMONCEUX

RAF HERSTMONCEUX & WARTLING

RAF SEAFORD BAY

SOLAR LADY - STATUE

SUMMER SOLSTICE

SUSSEX TRUGGERY

THOMAS ALVA EDISON

TOURISM DCMS

TREE HOUSES

TREE PRESERVATION

TRUGS

WORLD ELECTRIFICATION HISTORY

WWII AIR RAID SHELTER

 

 

 

GOOGLE MAPS - The detail is not that great and the situation on the land is significantly improved in that the site has undergone a massive clean up to remove the build up of flora. You can though see the brick walls indicative of the extent of the foundation layout to the rear (north-east) of the main generating buildings. The walls have been partly repaired and a smaller part of the footprint covered with decking and water goods to protect the archaeological features. The eventual objective is to restore the section that was taken down completely.

 

 

 

RED SKY - Red sky at night, shepherds delight. This stunning sunset was taken one balmy evening in Herstmonceux, Sussex as the sun went down. We tend to take these glorious views for granted, when they are spectacular and sometimes take your breath away from the sheer beauty. Copyright © photograph June 30 2017. You will need the permission of Lime Park Heritage Trust to use this picture. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

This website is Copyright © 2017.   All rights reserved.  All other trademarks are hereby acknowledged.  Contact Us   www.cherrymortgages.com